Water You Think About Reuse?

Water You Think About Reuse?

wh-1Emory University has an on-site water recycling system unlike any other in the nation. Emory’s WaterHub uses sustainable technology which mimics natural processes to clean wastewater for non-potable uses such as heating and cooling, irrigation, and toilet flushing. Team Water from the Athens-Clarke County Water Conservation Office took a trip to Atlanta, GA for a sneak peak of the Hub’s inner-workings. Let’s dive in to the details!

Wastewater Source

The water treated at the WaterHub is diverted from an on-campus sewer pipe to the greenhouse portion of the water reclamation site. The water gets screened to remove any non-bio-degradables then goes through additional cleaning processes.

Hydroponic Treatment System

wh-4A variety of low-maintenance tropical plants are featured in the greenhouse. Their dense root systems are submerged in the wastewater and provide excellent habitat for waste-treating microorganisms to thrive. Microorganisms play a huge role in reclaiming wastewater; by consuming excess nutrients, they biologically purify the water. It is extremely important to maintain an environment that is beneficial to the microorganisms so they can break down pollutants in the water. In addition to clinging onto plant roots, microorganisms benefit from the added surface area of a BioWeb textile media (shown to the left) and honeycomb-shaped plastic pellets that move freely in the water as biofilm carriers. Microorganisms work efficiently to break down organic waste when given appropriate living conditions.

Reciprocating Wetland Technologywh-5

Tidal marsh ecosystems are mimicked at the WaterHub to provide alternating anoxic and aerobic treatment conditions. Wastewater is filled and drained in adjacent bio-cells that contain gravel. The gravel serves as microorganism habitat during this stage. The recurrent fill-and-drain sequence allows control of microbial processes.

Clarifying, Filtering, & Disinfecting

After the microorganisms complete their part of the treatment, the nearly-clean water flows to a clarifier tank and disk filter where any remaining solids, nutrients, and color are removed from the water. Some microorganisms are taken from the clarifier tank and relocated to the beginning of treatment where they repeat the process of breaking down bio solids and sludge. Once the water flows over the disk filters, only trace amounts of microorganisms remain. Ultraviolet disinfection disrupts the DNA of remaining microorganisms, making the water safe to use for non-potable demands. The ready-to-use water is delivered through a series of purple pipes to differentiate the supply from wastewater and drinking water.

Recycling Water Is A No-Brainer!

Custom, satellite wastewater reclamation facilities like the Emory WaterHub are efficient and cost-effective. Water naturally recycles in the environment, but why not extend the life cycle of water even further like the WaterHub does? On-site water reclamation reduces withdrawals from sensitive ecosystems and eliminates a significant portion of the water distribution system, thus reducing a community’s carbon and water footprints.

Let’s get on board with sustainable water reuse and make a greater effort to use water wisely! For more information about the WaterHub and Sustainable Water, visit here.

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Today’s blog was written by Emily Bilcik, Graduate Assistant at the WCO.

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Catch 5 Pokémon at a Water Reclamation Facility

Today’s blog is written by Laurie Loftin, who has no background in protozoology or official Pokémon training.

A Spearow Pokémon caught at the clarifying basin.

A Spearow Pokémon caught at the clarifying basin.

Want to catch a Pokémon?  You can find BILLIONS of Pokémon at our water reclamation facilities.  OK, maybe they are not true Pokémon, but microorganisms are pretty close.  Like pocket monsters, they are hard to see, but once you start to look through a microscope you realize they are all around you.

The water reclamation operators act as the microorganisms trainers.  They help these little guys grow, thrive, and evolve into stronger and more experienced microogranisms.  They use these “good” bugs to fight against “villains” lurking in our waters. The result is a collection of micro-monsters who do battle to protect our water.

Here are some of the real life mircoorganisms that could pass as Pokémon swimming in the waters at our water reclamation facility.

 

Keratella Rotifer

Keratella
Type: Metazoa; Phylum: Rotifera

Rotifer “Pokémon” are the workhorse of the activated sludge treatment process. They are multi-celled animals that feed on things like bacteria and algae, helping to keep bacteria levels in check.  Many have a corona near their mouth that looks like a spinning wheel. It gives the rotifer the ability to suck particles out of the water and into their waiting mouth.  Pretty cool.

paramecium

Paramecium
Type: Protozoa ; Phylum: Ciliophora

No, “paramecium” is not Latin for two mice.  It is a slipper-shaped single-celled organism with a hairy coat of cilia that propels the paramecium through the waters in a corkscrew-fashion.  This little guy may lack eyes, ears, and a heart, but it is a trainer’s go-to-bug for controlling algae, bacteria, and other protists it finds floating nearby.

 


Amoeba
Type: Protozoa; Phylum: Lobosa

It may be the most primitive single-celled protozoa, but don’t let this fool you. Its ability to transform its shape and color makes this would be Pokemon harder to catch than others. That is if you are another microorganism hoping to eat an amoeba. Operators like this guy for the information it can share about the water. If large amounts of amoeba are counted in a sample, it could mean a large presence of particulate matter, lack of oxygen in the water, or a shock load of BOD.

vorticella15

Vorticella
Type: Protozoa; Phylum: Ciliophora

These single-cell protozoa are one of the higher life forms found in our facilities. They have important abilities, like forming floc, removing floating particles from the water, and controlling bacteria levels.  This stalked ciliate’s body is covered in cilia, which assists them in swimming, crawling, sensing, and eating.

water bear

Water Bear
Type: Metazoa; Phylum: Tardigrades

The water bear is by far the cutest of all the microorganism swimming about our flush waters. They are also the most bad-a**. They can survive being boiled, frozen, in a vacuum, or exposed to radiation. We all need water, but these little guys can go a decade without it and still survive! In our sludge, they help out by eating the microorganisms easily tempted to join a villain team.

I admit, the capture of these microorganisms won’t help you complete your Pokédex, but the water reclamation facility does prove to be the ultimate gym for these bug types to fight.  And the best part is the battle ends with a better environment and clean water in both augmented reality and reality.  Wishing you luck on your quest to try and catch ’em all.

Paddle the Basin! Today Only!

Today’s blog is by Marilyn Hall, Water Conservation Coordinator for Athens-Clarke County, GA

Today is going to be a beautiful day!  It might even get to 80 degrees this afternoon.  Can you think of a better way to celebrate Spring than enjoying a paddle-boat ride with your family?  Me neither!  That is why we invite you to “Paddle the Basin” at the Cedar Creek WRF.  Come See wastewater treatment close up and personal. From 2-5 PM today the Cedar Creek Water Reclamation Facility is open to paddle boat tours! See micro-organisms up close and meet the unsung heroes of wastewater treatment! For more information contact the Athens-Clarke County Water Conservation Office at 706-613-3729 or thinkatthesink.com

Kids from Sandy Creek Nature Center Spring Break Camp test out one of our new boats!

Kids from Sandy Creek Nature Center Spring Break Camp test out one of our new boats!

We have been cleaning wastewater here in Athens since before the Clean Water Act! The first ACC wastewater treatment plant was built in 1962 along the North Oconee River. Another soon followed by the Middle Oconee in 1964 and a third began operations near Cedar Creek in 1980. Advances in wastewater treatment technology and population growth made it necessary ACC improve and expand the capacity of these plants. By 2012, the North Oconee and Cedar Creek plants had been decommissioned and new facilities were built and are operating in these locations. The Middle Oconee plant received a complete and extensive upgrade.

The plants are now referred to as Water Reclamation Facilities (WRF). The effluent (discharge) from a WRF is of such high quality, it can be reused in irrigation and safely returned to our waterways. The water is “reclaimed”.

We hope you will come see for yourself today when you can “Paddle the Basin” at Cedar Creek!

Facebook Event for Paddle the Basin!